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Search results 81 - 90 of 291 matching essays
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81: AIDS: A U.S.- Made Monster?
... previously discovered. However, this claim was not published in professional publications, and soon after, Alizon and Montagnier, two researchers of the Pasteur Institute in Paris published charts of HTLV-1 and HIV, showing that the viruses had basically different structures. They also declared categorically that they knew of no natural process by which one of these two forms could have evolved into the other. According to the professional "science" magazine, the ... of genes. According to the Segals, AIDS was practically the sole topic of discussion. THE AIDS VIRUS The Segals discuss the findings of Gonda et al, who compared the HIV, visna and other closely-related viruses and found that the visna virus is the most similar to HIV. The two were, in fact, 60% identical in 1986. According to findings of the Hahn group, the mutation rate of the HIV virus was about a million times higher than that of similar viruses, and that on the average a 10% alteration took place every two years. That would mean that in 1984, the difference between HIV and visna would have been only 30%, in 1982- 20%, 10% ...
82: Mononucleosis 3
... a century. An estimated 90 percent of mononucleosis cases are caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of the herpes virus group. Most of the remaining cases are caused by certain other herpes viruses, particularly cytomegalo virus. This fact sheet focuses on mononucleosis caused by EBV. EBV is a common virus that scientists estimate has infected over 90 percent of people aged 40 or older sometime during their lives. These infections can occur with no symptoms of disease. Like all herpes viruses, EBV remains in the body for life after infection, usually kept under control by a healthy immune system. Almost anyone at any age can get mononucleosis. Seventy to 80 percent of all documented cases, however ... syndrome.) Oral steroid drugs such as prednisone can help lessen some of the symptoms of mononucleosis, but because of their potential toxicity, these drugs are best reserved for treating severe complications. Antibiotics are ineffective against viruses, and they should not be prescribed for mononucleosis itself. Some patients with mononucleosis also develop streptococcal (bacterial) throat infections, which should be treated with penicillin or erythromycin. Ampicillin (a form of penicillin) should not ...
83: The Ebola Virus
... antigenic protein and sometimes a lipid layer surrounds it as well. The virus provides the genetic code for replication, and the host cell provides the necessary energy and raw materials. There are more than 200 viruses that are know to cause disease in humans. The Ebola virus, which dates back to 1976, has four strains each from a different geographic area, but all give their victims the same painful, often lethal symptoms. The Ebola virus is a member of a family of RNA viruses known as ‘ Filoviriade' and falling under one genus, ‘Filovirus'. "The Ebola virus and Marburg virus are the two known members of the Filovirus family" (Journal of the American Medical Association 273: 1748). Marburg is a ... human has been linked to naturally infected monkeys anywhere on the African continent. It is also not clear how the chimpanzee may have contracted the disease. The usual hosts for these types of hemorrhagic causing viruses are rodents, ticks or mosquitos. The natural reservoir for Ebola viruses has not been identified and ... because of the high mortality rate seen in apes they are unlikely to be the reservoir (Le Guenno ...
84: Cancer
... can cause damage and it can then continue to spread without any regulation. Cervical Cancer is caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) that gets in undetected. It then continues to reproduce itself to create many viruses that will eventually digest the p53. Breast Cancer is an exception to the 60% of human cancers caused by p53 in that many variations of it still contain a healthy p53 gene. When p53 is ... therapy that would inevitably prove unsuccessful. The p53 has also shown great opportunities for progress in treating many types of cancer. Jack Roth of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center has made viruses that actually contain sets of healthy p53. These viruses would then be injected into the tumor and could act as the body's own genes, killing and destroying the tumor. In a study, 3 out of 9 patients experienced their tumor's halt ...
85: Schizophrenia
... schizophrenia was the relationship between the child and the parents (Torrey 91). Within the last thirty years, though, considerable interest has been given to the thought of infectious disease as the cause of schizophrenia. Since viruses can, and do, onlyb affect certain areas of the brain while living others unharmed, such as the rabies virus and herpes zoster virus, it could account for the bizarre symptoms in schizophrenics (Bebbington 80). Viruses mat also change the function of the brain cells without changing their structure (Bebbington 81). For example cell enzymes may be permantly disrupted by a viral infection and the cell would continue to live and show no signs of damage. Which means thar viruses could cause schizophrenia and leave no sign of it. Another intriguing fact about viruses as a possible cause of schizophrenia is the fact that they may remain latent for many years at a time, ...
86: Genetic Engineering, History and Future
... which is resistant to a particular antibiotic. This now indestructible bacterial pestilence wages havoc on the human body. Genetic engineering is conquering this medical dilemma by utilizing diseases that target bacterial organisms. these diseases are viruses, named bacteriophages, "which can be produced to attack specific disease-causing bacteria" (Stableford 61). Much success has already been obtained by treating animals with a "phage" designed to attack the E. coli bacteria (Stableford 60). Diseases caused by viruses are much more difficult to control than those caused by bacteria. Viruses are not whole organisms, as bacteria are, and reproduce by hijacking the mechanisms of other cells. Therefore, any treatment designed to stop the virus itself, will also stop the functioning of its host cell. ...
87: Genetic Engineering: A Leap In To The Future Or A Leap Towards Destruction
... bacterium which is resistant to a particular antibiotic. This indestructible bacterial pestilence wages havoc on the human body. Genetic engineering is conquering this medical dilemma by utilizing diseases that target bacterial organisms. These diseases are viruses, named bacteriophages, "which can be produced to attack specific disease-causing bacteria" (Stableford 61). Much success has already been obtained by treating animals with a "phage" designed to attack the E. coli bacteria (Stableford 60). Diseases caused by viruses are much more difficult to control than those caused by bacteria. Viruses are not whole organisms, as bacteria are, and reproduce by hijacking the mechanisms of other cells. Therefore, any treatment designed to stop the virus itself, will also stop the functioning of its host cell. ...
88: Mononucleosis
... you an infection, can be transmitted by infection without actual contact, or can be caused by a microorganism. All species of animals are afflicted with infections caused by a wide variety of organisms, from submicroscopic viruses to wormlike parasites. When a person has an infectious disease like mono the organism gains access to the patients body, survives, and then multiples. Next, the patient gets the symptoms. Then the patient may die or recover spontaneously, or the infection may respond to specific therapy. Often there is an immunity. Infectious diseases have strongly influenced the course of history on Earth. The organisms responsible for human infections are viruses. Viruses are simple life forms consisting of nucleic acid, encoding genetic information , and surface components of protein that enable them to enter cells. Viruses are unable to multiple outside of cells. Mono is found in ...
89: The Ebola Virus
... antigenic protein and sometimes a lipid layer surrounds it as well. The virus provides the genetic code for replication, and the host cell provides the necessary energy and raw materials. There are more than 200 viruses that are know to cause disease in humans. The Ebola virus, which dates back to 1976, has four strains each from a different geographic area, but all give their victims the same painful, often lethal symptoms. The Ebola virus is a member of a family of RNA viruses known as ‘ Filoviriade' and falling under one genus, ‘Filovirus'. "The Ebola virus and Marburg virus are the two known members of the Filovirus family" (Journal of the American Medical Association 273: 1748). Marburg is a ... human has been linked to naturally infected monkeys anywhere on the African continent. It is also not clear how the chimpanzee may have contracted the disease. The usual hosts for these types of hemorrhagic causing viruses are rodents, ticks or mosquitos. The natural reservoir for Ebola viruses has not been identified and ... because of the high mortality rate seen in apes they are unlikely to be the reservoir (Le Guenno ...
90: AIDS
... previously discovered. However, this claim was not published in professional publications, and soon after, Alizon and Montagnier, two researchers of the Pasteur Institute in Paris published charts of HTLV-1 and HIV, showing that the viruses had basically different structures. They also declared categorically that they knew of no natural process by which one of these two forms could have evolved into the other. According to the professional "science" magazine, the ... of genes. According to the Segals, AIDS was practically the sole topic of discussion. THE AIDS VIRUS The Segals discuss the findings of Gonda et al, who compared the HIV, visna and other closely-related viruses and found that the visna virus is the most similar to HIV. The two were, in fact, 60% identical in 1986. According to findings of the Hahn group, the mutation rate of the HIV virus was about a million times higher than that of similar viruses, and that on the average a 10% alteration took place every two years. That would mean that in 1984, the difference between HIV and visna would have been only 30%, in 1982- 20%, 10% ...


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